Children and Chores: How to Enjoyably Work Together on the Homestead

On pileOn the homestead, everyone in the family needs to chip in to get things done. There are chores suitable for children of all ages from feeding chickens and taking out the compost to weeding the garden and harvesting fruit. Work doesn’t need to be drudgery but can be an enjoyable thing that the family works at together. Continue reading

Rediscovering Traditions: How Sustainable Living is a Trend, Again

young farmer with flowersSustainability, self-sufficiency, and environmental friendliness has recently hit the younger generations in a big way. All over the internet, thousands of young people are sharing their dreams of one day living a life filled with vegetable gardens, solar power, clotheslines, butter churns, bread baking, and farm animals. Continue reading

The Family Larder: Why It’s Still Important

canned food in jarsLarder may not be a familiar word in our modern times, but it was a very important thing in your great-great grandma’s day. It was the stash of food that families pickled, smoked, salted and preserved for the winter months ahead. A well stocked larder was often essential for survival for the pioneers since many times they lacked the luxury of a grocery store they could frequent if their supply ran short. Continue reading

Gardening Tools I Can’t Live Without

Editor’s Note: It’s our pleasure to welcome homesteader and writer Jill Winger as our guest blogger. She’s the author of The Prairie Homestead Cookbook and is sharing with us today her gardening insights. Enjoy!

Gardening in Wyoming is an extreme sport.

Between the violent hailstorms, too-close-for-comfort prairie tornadoes, Mother’s Day blizzards, and early September frosts, I like to joke that our state motto should be “World’s Worst Place to Garden.” Continue reading

Alternate Seed Sources

With the current shift in the economy, there has been a massive – massive! – spike in the number of people interested in growing gardens. Hundreds of thousands – possibly millions – of new plots are springing up across the country. Some are large, some are small, and all are important.

Normally the renaissance in gardening would be good news. However the surge of interest is stretching seed businesses to the limit. Continue reading

The (re)Rise of Victory Gardens

With local or regional shortages of fresh produce resulting from the current pause in the economy, there has been a new interest in an old classic: planting Victory Gardens.

A Victory Garden – sometimes called a crisis garden – is simply a small garden squeezed into any available spot of dirt to supplement food sources during times of national emergencies (such as world wars). Continue reading

Soil Tips for New Gardeners

planting seedlingsWhen life brings uncertainty, it motivates people to make their food supply as secure as possible. This was true when Victory Gardens sprang up during both World War I and World War II, where it is estimated up to 40% of the nation’s produce came from backyard gardens. We are seeing this trend playing out again in our current COVID-19 age with a huge influx of new gardeners and overwhelmed seed companies. With many folks staying at home, it is also a perfect time to be planting and tending a garden. Continue reading

Making It Yourself: Why Bother?

Kathy's homemade soap. Find the supplies you need to make yours at Lehmans.com and our store in Kidron, Ohio.

Kathy’s homemade soap. Find the supplies you need to make yours at Lehmans.com and our store in Kidron, Ohio.

I recently taught a workshop on soapmaking at our local folk school. I was telling a friend about it and she asked a pretty profound question: Why do you bother? Continue reading

St. Patrick’s Day Planting

Our Amish-made furrowing hoe has a razor-sharp, arrowhead-shaped blade that makes defined furrows for planting and enables you to weed around small, tender seedlings and plants without damaging them (and without having to get on your hands and knees). At Lehmans.com and our store in Kidron, Ohio.

Our Amish-made furrowing hoe has a razor-sharp, arrowhead-shaped blade that makes defined furrows for planting and enables you to weed around small, tender seedlings and plants without damaging them (and without having to get on your hands and knees). At Lehmans.com and our store in Kidron, Ohio.

Editor’s Note: This article comes to us from Becky Workinger, Lehman’s former Customer Service Manager. Enjoy!

I remember my maternal grandfather always saying, “Plant your peas on St Patrick’s Day.” March the 17th in Northeastphoto2 Ohio can be a very cold, wintry, blustery day. Not the case this year – it was sunny and 55 degrees when I got home from work.  Just ten days ago there were still piles of snow on the ground and I still had Christmas lights on the flagpole making a tree effect with lights.

My family has always been gardeners, and I married a farmer who has taught me even more the stewardship of the land, the love of agriculture and how important it is to all of us. Earlier in the day I thought of the planting and ran at my lunch break to purchase seeds.
Continue reading

Gardening in January

gardening in snowHave a hankering for fresh tomatoes? Or watermelon so sweet and juicy?

Summer may seem like a distant memory in the middle of January (especially for those of us that are covered in snow), but that doesn’t mean you have to wait for warmer weather to start planning your summer harvest. Continue reading