Amish Wash Day Dinner is a Busy Day Timesaver for You

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As you might imagine, a traditional Amish Wash Day is filled with activity – and not much goes on in the kitchen. This is a delicious, slow-baking dinner that frees you up to work on other projects.

Amish Wash Day Dinner
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Ingredients
  1. 1 Tbsp. butter
  2. 1 large onion, sliced
  3. potatoes, peeled and sliced
  4. 2 Tbsp. flour
  5. 1 can tomato juice (store-bought or home-canned)
  6. Sliced sausage (country-style or Italian)
  7. boiling water
  8. salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Using a roasting pan or dutch oven, melt butter in the pan and line the bottom with a layer of onion.
  2. Place potatoes on top of onion.
  3. Sift flour over potatoes.
  4. Pour tomato juice over all and cover with sliced sausage.
  5. Add boiling water to cover and salt and pepper to taste.
  6. Bake slowly at 300 degrees for 3 hours. Turn meat if it gets too brown.
Adapted from AmishCooks.com
Adapted from AmishCooks.com
Lehman's Country Life http://blog.lehmans.com/

 

Our Cyber Monday FREE SHIPPING Deal Ends TONIGHT.

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FREE SHIPPING ON ALL ORDERS $40 or MORE – TODAY ONLY!

Happy “Cyber Monday!” Shop on our site today and get FREE SHIPPING on every order of $40 or more!

But don’t wait, because this special Cyber Monday deal ends tonight, November 30, 2015 at midnight EST!

Here’s how to get it:

  1. Place all your goodies in your cart on Lehmans.com.
  2. At checkout, enter coupon code HOLIDAY15.
  3. Go back to the leftover stuffing. 

Click here to start SHOPPING >>

*Excludes freight items

Black Friday Savings at Lehmans.com!

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Our store in Kidron, Ohio is hopping today with guests enjoying hourly specials, an Amish haystack dinner, delicious treats and surprises galore. Can’t make it to Kidron today (or just feel like shopping in your pajamas and fuzzy slippers)? We’ve got a great deal for YOU.

Shop online at Lehmans.com today through Sunday and ship it all for FREE*.

  1. Load up your cart with $60 or more of Christmas gifts and goodies.
  2. Use coupon code FRIDAY15 at checkout.
  3. Enjoy a leftover turkey sandwich by the wood stove

Happy Black Friday, and happy weekend, too! This deal ENDS Saturday, November 28, 2015 at 11:59 pm EST.

* excludes freight items

A Thanksgiving Greeting

“Thankful for friends and loved ones, too,
Thankful for all things, good and true,
Thankful for harvest in the fall,
Thankful to Him who gave it all.”
Lizelia Augusta Jenkins Moorer

Wishing you and yours a very Happy Thanksgiving!

From the Lehman family (Galen Lehman, CEO; Glenda Lehman Ervin, VP of Marketing; and Jay Lehman, Founder)

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Black Friday in the Country – Come Join the Fun!

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We’re getting ready for a fun, relaxing day in Kidron!

WHAT: We’re combining the promotions of Black Friday with the old-fashioned simplicity of Lehman’s on Friday, November 27. Take advantage of big savings, while enjoying what Lehman’s does best — offering a slower, simpler way of life right here in Amish Country. We’ll have store-wide savings, hourly deals, a “haystack dinner” special in the Cast Iron Cafe. . . and our neighboring Kidron, OH stores will be offering special deals, too.

WHEN: Friday, November 27, 2015. Lehman’s will be open from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.

WHERE: Lehman’s in Kidron, Ohio (GPS/mapping address 4779 Kidron Rd., Dalton OH 44618). Participating businesses are within walking or very short driving distance of our store.

WHO: Lehman’s store, plus other Kidron merchants including MCC Connections, Eastwood Furniture, Quince Café, and World Crafts (and maybe more)

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SPECIALS AND SALES at LEHMAN’S:

  • We will be open LATE, until 7 pm!
  • The Cast Iron Café special will be an Amish-style “Haystack” meal
  • Special pricing on select products store-wide, including Purple Ball Jars, Lodge 12 in skillet, select old-time toys, select games, men’s leather belts, and more!
  • Anyone who shops 4-7pm receives a 20% off discount
  • Anyone (young or old) who wears bib overalls will receive a free gift and be entered into a drawing to win a $60 Lehman’s gift card (just enter your name at the Customer Service counter)

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WHY: We want to offer a fun, feel-good alternative to the crazy that has become associated with Black Friday. Customers will enjoy great deals on some of our favorite items, fill their bellies with an Amish Country meal, snack on free cookies and cider and enjoy their time out with friends and family. This is a great opportunity for people who have family visiting for the holidays who want to get out of the house and explore our little corner of Amish Country. Come join us!

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Brine That Bird (Simple Trick for Amazing Turkey)

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Planning the best Thanksgiving turkey ever? Shelley, Lehman’s Merchandising Assistant, has been brining her family’s Thanksgiving bird for the past several years, and she shared her simple recipe with us. Brining the turkey for at least 12 hours before roasting makes it extra moist, and this recipe gives the meat a slightly sweet flavor (which Shelley says her brood loves). Try it this year – it’s quick, easy and it just may become part of your Turkey Day tradition.

Classic Turkey Brine

You’ll need:

  • 1 gallon water
  • 1 cup coarse salt (such as sea salt or pink salt)
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1 orange, juiced and rind finely grated
  • 1 tablespoon whole cloves
  • 1 tablespoon whole allspice
  • 1 tablespoon whole black peppercorns
  • 1 turkey, 12-15 lb (thaw turkey and remove giblets before brining)
  • Ice (enough to cover turkey)
  • large stockpot and/or storage container with lid (such as a 5-gallon bucket or 4-gallon bucket)

Directions:

In a large stockpot, combine all ingredients except turkey and ice. Bring to a boil and stir to dissolve salt and sugar. Remove from heat and let stand 30 minutes. Chill. Place the turkey, brining liquid and ice in stockpot or lidded bucket and let stand up to 12 hours, refrigerated (overnight works well). Roast and feast!

Top 10 Tools for The Baker’s Toolbox

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I bake a great deal. So when Lehman’s asked me to name 10 Essential Baker’s Items, I jumped at the chance. No matter what you hear about kitchen tools, there’s one thing that holds true: if you pay for quality, it will last ages. These are pieces that will last you for years. You’ll find yourself using many of them for everyday cooking chores, too. Continue reading

Stay Sharp This Holiday Season

Be ready for the holiday meal carving, slicing and cutting with our top-quality German-made knife and block set. At Lehmans.com and our store in Kidron, Ohio.

Be ready for the holiday meal carving, slicing and cutting with our top-quality German-made knife and block set. At Lehmans.com and our store in Kidron, Ohio.

My wife says I’m the biggest kid she knows on Christmas morning. I’d have to agree with her, but I would add Thanksgiving Day to that list as well. The difference is this big kid is allowed to play with knives.

I have always enjoyed Thanksgiving and Christmas. Aside from the “real reason for the season,” for me it’s mainly about the food and giving gifts. For my wife it’s about dinner parties and making memories around the dining room table. Continue reading

Stock Up: Get the most from your big bird!

Get the most out of your holiday turkeys (or even chickens)- make some stock!turkey_019

We always get at least one extra turkey at Thanksgiving because the prices are so good. And when we did, we realized we still had a 23 pound bird in our freezer.

To make room for this year’s extra turkey, we had an early Thanksgiving feast. I really enjoyed this week of good eats. We had easy, tasty protein to add to our rice bowls, salads and sandwiches. We also could split the favorites of the classic meal into many different meals throughout the week.

As an added benefit I can freeze some so I have safe roasted turkey on the ready for my daughter, who has several food allergies. It’s great to pre-prep a quick snack or meal for her.

I like to cook my turkey in a roaster. I always make a large pot of stock from the neck and gizzards, liver and heart while the meat is roasting. I put the neck, the ‘innards’, fresh sage, garlic and a quartered onion to simmer in a large stockpot. I let it bubble away all afternoon and used it for gravy, basting and stuffing.

After I’d made gravy for our early turkey dinner, I canned the stock that was left and had Turkey stock 3five quarts of stock just from the stockpot.

Since it was such a large turkey for the four of us, John sliced it down, while I picked off all the usable meat for some turkey salad and other future dinners.

Then I took the bones and returned them to my now clean roaster with some more onions, garlic and this time a couple carrots and celery stalks. I filled the roaster with water and let it simmer all night through the next day.

It was some work to get the fat off the top, but I found that cheese cloth or a paper towel fatseparatoralong the top skimmed well. (A gravy separator will work well too.) From the simmered bones, I got another thirteen quarts of stock.

It only takes 25 minutes at 11 pounds of pressure to can stock. In years past I have frozen it and while it may be a bit quicker to freeze stock, I have had to dodge large frozen blocks of it falling out of the bulging freezer.

Then when I would go to use it I would need to defrost it and often the container it was may have been cracked from an escape attempt, and the whole thing was just a production.

With canned stock, it is just easy breezy ready to use. I just pop the top and go. It’s definitely worth the time invested to clean the jars and do the canning properly.

I also plan to make some vegetable stock with the veggies that tend to be on sale for the making of thanksgiving feasts. I also freeze any of the celery or carrots that aren’t crisp enough to eat or use the trimmings from other dishes over time.

It is super simple because you can just toss the cutting and leftover bits into a container and pull that out when you are ready to make veggie stock.

When you add the garlic and onions, don’t stress about peeling perfectly. I just pour mine through a strainer to get all the big chunks out. I leave the garlic whole, and quarter the onions.

So for much less than what the turkey stock alone would have been at the grocery store, I got gallons of turkey and veggie stock.

Plus we got a fresh roasted turkey, yummy turkey sandwiches, and all the other favoriteTurkey stock 1 leftovers.

I can season the stocks to taste when I am ready to use it and I know every ingredient. It doesn’t get more perfect or basic than that.

One recipe that I love to make with the stock and some frozen turkey is dumplings. Just google gluten free vegan chicken dumplings if you need to avoid wheat, milk or egg. We have to avoid those things, and searching for vegan recipes makes things simpler. I just don’t tell the vegan dumplings that they’re cooking up in my meaty turkey stock!

If you don’t have food limitations, make your favorite dumplings, and toss them into a pefect, homemade stock. Really in a rush? You want these pot pie noodles. They’re great, and locally made.

Let’s Play “The Mennonite Game”

Justina Dee, the talent behind lydiaglick.com

Justina Dee, the talent behind lydiaglick.com

Country Life met Justina Dee, the grandaughter of an Amish preacher in October, and immediately knew she was “our kind of people.” We’d like to introduce her with her light-hearted entry about “The Mennonite Game”, when…well. She’ll tell you. We just want you to know: click to her site and see the video. Be sure the family’s gathered around, because they’ll love it too.               –Karen Johnson, editor, Country Life

One of my favorite things about being born into a family with Amish-Mennonite roots is the deep appreciation of family history and belonging which you are given. As a young child with Anabaptist ancestors, you quickly learn there are two things of great importance.

Lesson one – your family genealogy. My father is a brilliant steward of our family’s history and stories. One year he purchased the most recent edition of something we call “The Fisher Book”. (A record with thousands of Amish-Mennonite relatives.) My little brother was so excited to find his name in the new printing of the “Fisher Book” that he circled the text in dark black ink – not something you typically do in a very expensive and significant ancestral document. I’m sure someday his descendants will enjoy seeing the mark he made on history!

Read more here, and don’t miss the video:
http://www.lydiaglick.com/the-mennonite-game/