Can you make your Wind-Up Flashlight Sing?

Solar and Hand-Powered Safety Flashlight

Solar and Hand-Powered Safety Flashlight

When is a flashlight not a flashlight?

When it joins the orchestra!

While this sounds like a joke that some of the kids would get up on stage to tell on Camp Cabaret Night, it is quite soberly a fact. To get everyone in the act, our compere Diarmuid, set challenges for to make music from unusual, not to say eccentric, sources. It is perfectly possible (Liam proved it) to make a joyful noise from a wheel wrench! It reminded me a little of a higher pitched tuba. Wind-up flashlights are not only practical and eco-friendly, they can also be pressed into musical instrument duty and make a delightful whizzing sound when wound.

In these northerly latitudes of Ireland we are beginning to notice the long, light evenings slipping away. With all the rain that has been deluging these Isles, we have needed to turn on indoor lights in the early morning much sooner than normal. The trusty wind-up flashlights have stood at the ready when the storms have knocked out our electricity for twelve hours at a stretch. On murky evenings we need them for the last dog outing of the day.

Solar Emergency AM/FM/Weather Radio/Light

Solar Emergency AM/FM/Weather Radio/Light

With my zeal to cut down on our consumption (and therefore, our waste) wind up solar flashlights have become my best ‘gadget.’ I keep one in the glove box of the car, one in my bedside cabinet and one by the front door for dog walking purposes. I am a bit skeptical about technological fixes but these flashlights are the biz! They get used regularly; consequently, we aren’t sending batteries to leak toxic material in land fill.

And as Diarmuid proved to us, when their practical uses have been exhausted you can open up a whole new section in the orchestra! Whizzzzzzzzzzz!

About BeeSmith

I was born in Queens, N.Y, reared in Pennsylvania, did university in Washington, D.C. Then I moved to England for nineteen years. I lived first in London and then in Leeds. After my partner's sister died of cancer in 2000, we decided to take the leap of faith and move to Ireland to be nearer his family. Despite our friends thinking we were mad and feckless, it has worked out. The angels really do look after fools! We have a cottage on an acre and a quarter three miles from where the River Shannon rises. We have a polytunnel to grow vegetables and fruit organically, a small orchard of apple trees and plans to create a sacred space on the land over the rest of our lifetimes. We share our home with two tortoiseshell cats, Zelda and her daughter Zymina, and three dogs, Murphy, Pippin and Cara.