Noodle-y Recipes for National Noodle Month

chicken noodle soupEditor’s Note: Did you know March is National Noodle Month? It is also the month of “Eat Your Noodles” Day (March 11) and National Chicken Noodle Soup Day (March 13). In celebration, we’re sharing with you some noodle-filled recipes. Enjoy!

Noodles are one of the oldest foods. Archaeologist’s research has found the remains of noodles linked back to the 1st century in China. They are made of wheat, mung beans, barley, rice and many more ingredients. In fact, noodle recipes can be found in nearly every cuisine of the world.

Noodles and pastas come in many different names and shapes. You can make them at home from scratch or find them in your local grocery store. Use them in soups, casseroles, side dishes, the variety is endless. Here are some simple recipes to enjoy.

Old Fashion Chicken Noodle Soup in Your Slow Cooker
Chicken noodle soup is long known for its comfort and healing properties. This recipe has all the deep flavors of the homemade chicken soup you grew up on.

Ingredients:

  • 8 cups chicken stock
  • 4 carrots, peeled, cut into 1/4-inch slices
  • 3 celery, peeled cut into 1/4-inch slices
  • 1 large sweet onion cut into quarters
  • 1 clove of garlic minced
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme, or, ½ teaspoon dried thyme
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 (3 ½) pound chicken, cut up
  • 3 cups wide egg noodles, uncooked

    extra wide egg noodles

    Homemade egg noodles is a specialty in Ohio’s Amish Country. Find extra wide egg noodles at Lehmans.com

In 4-1/2 to 6-quart slow-cooker, combine chicken stock, carrots, celery, onion, garlic, bay leaves, thyme, salt.

Place whole chicken on top of vegetables.

Cover slow cooker with lid and cook as manufacturer directs on low setting 8 to 10 hours or on high 4-5 hours.

Transfer chicken to cutting board. Discard bay leaves.

Cook egg noodles according to package instructions.

While noodles cook, remove and discard skin, fat and bones from chicken; shred meat, return chicken to slow-cooker.

Add cooked noodles and blend well, serve hot.

Shrimp and Glass Noodles
Making glass noodles are a lot of fun. If you haven’t tried them this recipe is a delicious place to start. You can change it up by switching out the proteins, seafood, chicken or for a meatless meal tofu.

Ingredients:

  • 1 (3.75-ounce) package uncooked bean threads (cellophane noodles)
  • 2 cups shredded rotisserie or cooked homemade chicken
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 teaspoons Sriracha (optional)
  • 2 cloves garlic minced fine
  • 1/2 cup matchstick-cut or grated carrot
  • 1/2 cup red bell pepper strips
  • 1/3 cup thinly sliced shallots
  • 2 tablespoons fresh cilantro leaves
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint
  • 1/2 cup chopped unsalted dry-roasted peanuts or cashews (optional)

Place noodles in a large bowl. Cover with very hot tap water and let stand 15 minutes.

While noodles soak, combine vinegar, lime juice, fish sauce, sugar, sriracha; stirring until sugar dissolves. Combine chicken, vegetables, shallots, cilantro, mint – tossing well.

Drain and rinse noodles with cold water; drain well, squeezing to remove excess water. To make them easier to eat you can snip the noodles several times with kitchen shears.

Combine noodles and chicken mixture, tossing well to combine.

When you are ready to serve; drizzle noodle mixture with vinegar mixture and toss well to coat. Top with nuts, if used.

Whether they are in your favorite Chinese take-out or a pasta dish with an Italian flare, noodles are a versatile base to make fun and tasty meals. Enjoy some noodles today.

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Dori Fritzinger has been a freelance writer since the days of typewriters and snail-mail. Her home life centers around a large multi-generational family and a small family farm. In her free time, she loves to read, quilt, and do embroidery. She also enjoys collecting vintage cookbooks and bringing the recipes to life so the cooks of the 21st century can enjoy them.

About Dori Fritzinger

I live and work with my multi-generational family in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in North Carolina. We have a farm of cows and calves, wool sheep, dairy goats, rabbits, ducks, geese, chickens, honey bees, a horse and a donkey. We have a goat's milk soap and bath products line available on our farm web site. I enjoy reading, quilting and doing embroidery.