How to Love Your Garden in a Time of Waiting

planting plantThis is an antsy time for gardeners. Where I live, late February and early March usually contain a “false spring” as I’ve heard it called, where the temps go up and the sun comes out, and I’m fooled into believing it’s the beginning of spring. But even just last week right after the weather had reached nice warm days, it snowed…in April. Continue reading

St. Patrick’s Day Planting

Our Amish-made furrowing hoe has a razor-sharp, arrowhead-shaped blade that makes defined furrows for planting and enables you to weed around small, tender seedlings and plants without damaging them (and without having to get on your hands and knees). At Lehmans.com and our store in Kidron, Ohio.

Our Amish-made furrowing hoe has a razor-sharp, arrowhead-shaped blade that makes defined furrows for planting and enables you to weed around small, tender seedlings and plants without damaging them (and without having to get on your hands and knees). At Lehmans.com and our store in Kidron, Ohio.

Editor’s Note: This article comes to us from Becky Workinger, Lehman’s former Customer Service Manager. Enjoy!

I remember my maternal grandfather always saying, “Plant your peas on St Patrick’s Day.” March the 17th in Northeastphoto2 Ohio can be a very cold, wintry, blustery day. Not the case this year – it was sunny and 55 degrees when I got home from work.  Just ten days ago there were still piles of snow on the ground and I still had Christmas lights on the flagpole making a tree effect with lights.

My family has always been gardeners, and I married a farmer who has taught me even more the stewardship of the land, the love of agriculture and how important it is to all of us. Earlier in the day I thought of the planting and ran at my lunch break to purchase seeds.
Continue reading

Children and Chores: How to Enjoyably Work Together on the Homestead

On pileOn the homestead, everyone in the family needs to chip in to get things done. There are chores suitable for children of all ages from feeding chickens and taking out the compost to weeding the garden and harvesting fruit. Work doesn’t need to be drudgery but can be an enjoyable thing that the family works at together. Continue reading

Gardening Tools I Can’t Live Without

Editor’s Note: It’s our pleasure to welcome homesteader and writer Jill Winger as our guest blogger. She’s the author of The Prairie Homestead Cookbook and is sharing with us today her gardening insights. Enjoy!

Gardening in Wyoming is an extreme sport.

Between the violent hailstorms, too-close-for-comfort prairie tornadoes, Mother’s Day blizzards, and early September frosts, I like to joke that our state motto should be “World’s Worst Place to Garden.” Continue reading

The Road Less Traveled

In 1916, the poet Robert Frost wrote a famous poem entitled “The Road Not Taken” in which a walker faces a forked path in the woods. One path is well-trod, the other path is overgrown. Which path should he take? The final stanza of the poem reads:

“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.”

Nearly 30 years ago, my husband and I stood at that metaphorical fork in our lives, and we took the road less traveled. It has made all the difference. Continue reading

Alternate Seed Sources

With the current shift in the economy, there has been a massive – massive! – spike in the number of people interested in growing gardens. Hundreds of thousands – possibly millions – of new plots are springing up across the country. Some are large, some are small, and all are important.

Normally the renaissance in gardening would be good news. However the surge of interest is stretching seed businesses to the limit. Continue reading

The (re)Rise of Victory Gardens

With local or regional shortages of fresh produce resulting from the current pause in the economy, there has been a new interest in an old classic: planting Victory Gardens.

A Victory Garden – sometimes called a crisis garden – is simply a small garden squeezed into any available spot of dirt to supplement food sources during times of national emergencies (such as world wars). Continue reading

Soil Tips for New Gardeners

planting seedlingsWhen life brings uncertainty, it motivates people to make their food supply as secure as possible. This was true when Victory Gardens sprang up during both World War I and World War II, where it is estimated up to 40% of the nation’s produce came from backyard gardens. We are seeing this trend playing out again in our current COVID-19 age with a huge influx of new gardeners and overwhelmed seed companies. With many folks staying at home, it is also a perfect time to be planting and tending a garden. Continue reading

Making It Yourself: Why Bother?

Kathy's homemade soap. Find the supplies you need to make yours at Lehmans.com and our store in Kidron, Ohio.

Kathy’s homemade soap. Find the supplies you need to make yours at Lehmans.com and our store in Kidron, Ohio.

I recently taught a workshop on soapmaking at our local folk school. I was telling a friend about it and she asked a pretty profound question: Why do you bother? Continue reading

What’s Happening on the Homestead: Sunflowers and Sunshine!

Sunflowers

We’re in the midst of summer and beautiful sunflowers have appeared. (Photo by Elizabeth Geiser)

What does July sunshine bring in Ohio? Some hot, sticky days to be sure but it also is the season of sunflowers, tomatoes, zucchini and more. After a cool, wet start to the garden season, the heat is making our popcorn and other plants grow almost in front of our eyes. It is now most pleasant to work in the garden in the early morning hours or the cool of the evening till we can’t see the weeds we are trying to pull. Popsicles made from homemade yogurt and fresh fruit are a main stay for getting through the afternoons. Continue reading