Honeysuckle Jelly

Who doesn’t remember licking the sweet nectar from the ends of honeysuckle blossoms as a child? I remember many childhood summers spent sitting in the shade, picking the little flowers one by one, pulling off their tips and sucking the sweetness out. Ah, but what a short while the honeysuckle bloomed.

What would you say if I told you that it’s possible to enjoy that same sweet flavor year round? If you are fortunate enough to have wild honeysuckle growing in your area, take a little time to pick a basket of those delicate white and yellow flowers and step into the kitchen for some homemade honeysuckle jelly. You’ll have a taste of summer even on the coldest winter days.

Honeysuckle Jelly
Yields 7 half-pints
4 cups honeysuckle flowers
4 cups boiling water
1/4 c. lemon juice
4 cups sugar
1 package liquid pectin

First you need to make an infusion to draw the flavor out of the flowers. It’s very simple. Prepare the flowers by removing the tiny green tip at the base of the petals.

Next, bring 4 cups of water to a boil in a large saucepan, turn the heat off, then add the honeysuckle flowers you’ve gathered and allow them to steep for about 45 min., stirring occasionally.

Strain the flowers from the liquid. You need two cups of the infusion for this recipe.

In the same saucepan, stir together 2 cups flower infusion, the lemon juice, and the sugar; bring to a hard boil that won’t stir down. Add the pectin and boil for 2 min; reduce heat if necessary to avoid boiling over.
Ladle into hot, sterilized jars, and screw on lids. Allow to cool for 24 hours, then test the lids to make sure the jars are properly sealed.

*I never process my jellies in a water bath canner, but you may certainly do so if it makes you feel better.
Spread on some freshly baked bread and enjoy!

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11 years ago

Honeysuckle 20 Ml…

[…] pulling off their tips and sucking the sweetness out. Ah, but what a short whil […]…

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11 years ago

Honeysuckle Flowers…

[…] mers spent sitting in the shade, picking the little flowers one by one, pulling […]…

Julie Ann Foster
Julie Ann Foster
11 years ago

This is very cool. I was wondering if you might know the botanical name of the honeysuckle. Out here in California we have several, but none are quite the same as the ones I remember from Wisconsin, as a child.

Michele Rousseau
Michele Rousseau
11 years ago

Sound so wonderful. Would also love to try rose petal jam

Kristen Watson Weldon
11 years ago

i want to try that!!!

Doodle Maier
Doodle Maier
11 years ago

I was hoping the honeybees would make a variation of this for me but it apears they would also get their heads stuck in the blossoms.

Mary Jane Plemons
Mary Jane Plemons
11 years ago

I made dandelion blossom jelly for the first time this year.

Cathy Huppert
Cathy Huppert
11 years ago

we used to suck the sweetness from lilac flowers too…same technique, just way smaller flower ;-)

Mary Heckler
11 years ago

I tried this one year, not sure if it was the same recipe, but its scrumptious! I wonder if the same basic recipe can be used for wisteria… Wisteria flowers has such a sweet tender taste…try sprinkling the flower petals into your pancake mix!

Mary Heckler
11 years ago

jane plemons, I would love to have your recipe for dandelion blossom jelly!

Mary Heckler
11 years ago

My daughter is looking for a pmegrante jelly recipe…does anyone have one they can share?

Mary Heckler
11 years ago

ooops sorry, thats suppose to be pomegrante jelly

Mary Heckler
11 years ago

thank you very much!

Mary Heckler
11 years ago

cant wait for all my fruit trees to start producing! its gonna be awesome!

Barbara Scilabro Merz
11 years ago

If I don’t have any liquid pectin, but I do have the powdered kind, can I use that, and, if so, how much?

Jennifer Patkel
11 years ago

funny..now I feel guilty when I get the nectar from my honey suckle.. keep thinking of my bees.. don’t want to compete with them, right?

Barbara Scilabro Merz
11 years ago

Thank you so much!

Wendy Paul
11 years ago

Wow! I have never heard of that. Will have to give it a try!!

Robina Walker Hogeland
Robina Walker Hogeland
11 years ago

Heckler.. All parts of wisteria are poisonous including the flowers. They are especially toxic to children.

Sharon Stephens Weinschreider
Sharon Stephens Weinschreider
11 years ago

My husband and I made the honeysuckle jelly this week and we love it! So fun to try something new

Susan Schooner
Susan Schooner
11 years ago

My bf and I made this Sunday. I had never made jelly before, and I have to say, it was amazing! I also learned the fine art of sucking the nectar from the blossoms. :) I would suggest that you make a double batch, though….cause it tells you to make 4 cups of honeysuckle essence, and the recipe only used 2 cups of it. I wish I would have read that first! I definitely need to make more…

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10 years ago

[…] obviously, when I saw this recipe on Pinterest, I knew exactly what I would be doing this spring!  Honeysuckle Jelly!  Whaaaa?  […]

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10 years ago

[…] all year long.  Give it a try.  Below is the recipe as it appears on Lehman’s web site (http://empty.lehmans.com/2011/06/14/honeysuckle-jelly/).  The photos are […]

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10 years ago

[…] Honeysuckle Jelly | Lehman’s Country LifeJun 14, 2011 … Take a little time to pick a basket of those delicate white and yellow flowers and step into the kitchen for some homemade honeysuckle jelly. […]

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9 years ago

[…] Over the weekend I did just that. I found an amazing recipe online at Lehman’s Country Life, http://empty.lehmans.com/2011/06/14/honeysuckle-jelly/. The most time consuming part is picking all the flowers we needed. After you get them all picked […]

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