Create Beautiful Fall Flower Arrangements, Lehman’s Style

our heritage syrup pitcher

Learn how to create beautiful flower arrangements for special occasions. (Photo by Elizabeth Geiser)

Fall wedding season is upon us and as a flower farmer, I am swimming in dahlias, celosia, zinnias and other autumnal beauties. With the popularity of barn weddings and outdoor venues, the rustic vibe is alive and well. What better way to express that than fresh local flowers arranged in some fun vessels from Lehman’s! Continue reading

The Benefits of Planting Native Plants

butterfly on flowerAll year long, homeowners across the globe do everything humanly possible to improve their landscaping. And with the numerous plant and flower species available at the garden centers and nursery, they are spoiled for choice, and they can give their backyard any look they desire. Unfortunately, most homeowners don’t know how native plants can benefit the environment, garden, birds, and even pollinators, EcoPeanut said.

Native crops have evolved over the last few centuries to their habitat; therefore, they can thrive in their native area. And compared to exotic plants, the native ones can also save you time, cash, and resources. After all, just because a crop can grow in a particular region doesn’t mean that it should be planted there. Landscaping with exotic crops can increase your expenses and even outgrow the native plants. Continue reading

How to Love Your Garden in a Time of Waiting

planting plantThis is an antsy time for gardeners. Where I live, late February and early March usually contain a “false spring” as I’ve heard it called, where the temps go up and the sun comes out, and I’m fooled into believing it’s the beginning of spring. But even just last week right after the weather had reached nice warm days, it snowed…in April. Continue reading

St. Patrick’s Day Planting

Our Amish-made furrowing hoe has a razor-sharp, arrowhead-shaped blade that makes defined furrows for planting and enables you to weed around small, tender seedlings and plants without damaging them (and without having to get on your hands and knees). At Lehmans.com and our store in Kidron, Ohio.

Our Amish-made furrowing hoe has a razor-sharp, arrowhead-shaped blade that makes defined furrows for planting and enables you to weed around small, tender seedlings and plants without damaging them (and without having to get on your hands and knees). At Lehmans.com and our store in Kidron, Ohio.

Editor’s Note: This article comes to us from Becky Workinger, Lehman’s former Customer Service Manager. Enjoy!

I remember my maternal grandfather always saying, “Plant your peas on St Patrick’s Day.” March the 17th in Northeastphoto2 Ohio can be a very cold, wintry, blustery day. Not the case this year – it was sunny and 55 degrees when I got home from work.  Just ten days ago there were still piles of snow on the ground and I still had Christmas lights on the flagpole making a tree effect with lights.

My family has always been gardeners, and I married a farmer who has taught me even more the stewardship of the land, the love of agriculture and how important it is to all of us. Earlier in the day I thought of the planting and ran at my lunch break to purchase seeds.
Continue reading

Rediscovering Traditions: How Sustainable Living is a Trend, Again

young farmer with flowersSustainability, self-sufficiency, and environmental friendliness has recently hit the younger generations in a big way. All over the internet, thousands of young people are sharing their dreams of one day living a life filled with vegetable gardens, solar power, clotheslines, butter churns, bread baking, and farm animals. Continue reading

Paper Gardening: How to Grow a Successful Garden Now

Maine Garden HodJanuary and February – traditionally the coldest, bleakest months of the year – have one highlight, something like the gardener’s version of the swallows returning to Capistrano: the arrival of seed catalogs in the mail. Continue reading

Children and Chores: How to Enjoyably Work Together on the Homestead

On pileOn the homestead, everyone in the family needs to chip in to get things done. There are chores suitable for children of all ages from feeding chickens and taking out the compost to weeding the garden and harvesting fruit. Work doesn’t need to be drudgery but can be an enjoyable thing that the family works at together. Continue reading

The Family Larder: Why It’s Still Important

canned food in jarsLarder may not be a familiar word in our modern times, but it was a very important thing in your great-great grandma’s day. It was the stash of food that families pickled, smoked, salted and preserved for the winter months ahead. A well stocked larder was often essential for survival for the pioneers since many times they lacked the luxury of a grocery store they could frequent if their supply ran short. Continue reading

Gardening Tools I Can’t Live Without

Editor’s Note: It’s our pleasure to welcome homesteader and writer Jill Winger as our guest blogger. She’s the author of The Prairie Homestead Cookbook and is sharing with us today her gardening insights. Enjoy!

Gardening in Wyoming is an extreme sport.

Between the violent hailstorms, too-close-for-comfort prairie tornadoes, Mother’s Day blizzards, and early September frosts, I like to joke that our state motto should be “World’s Worst Place to Garden.” Continue reading

Alternate Seed Sources

With the current shift in the economy, there has been a massive – massive! – spike in the number of people interested in growing gardens. Hundreds of thousands – possibly millions – of new plots are springing up across the country. Some are large, some are small, and all are important.

Normally the renaissance in gardening would be good news. However the surge of interest is stretching seed businesses to the limit. Continue reading